Korean Cultural Centre

Craft workshop series

The Korean Cultural Centre Australia (KCC) are hosting a series of free workshops at the Australian Design Centre in February, providing opportunities for participants to experience old and new Korean craft through hands-on experiences. 

The workshops are in conjunction with the KCC exhibition A scholar's feast: Old and Newthat illustrates traditional and contemporary Korean crafts related to the food and tableware. Spanning leather, glass, clay, fibre, wood, textile and brassware, it focuses to explore the value of Korean craft culture and the beauty of the handmade. 

We spoke to Saeyoung Park, Exhibition Manager at Korean Cultural Centre Australia about the upcoming events.

Q: Tell us about the Korean Cultural Centre Australia and Cheongju Craft Biennale. Where is the Centre and what is your focus?
A: Located opposite Hyde Park (255 Elizabeth Street Sydney), the Korean Cultural Centre Australia (KCC) has been introducing the appeal of Korean Culture to all people in Australia with the mission to connect our two countries by deepening our cultural bond. Throughout the year, the KCC offers a variety of cultural programs which include education programs for kids/youth along with exhibitions, cultural classes and events for the general public. In terms of exhibitions, we have been presenting a range of genre such as visual arts, media arts and crafts to explore Korean identity. 

Starting as the worlds’ first crafts biennale in 1999, Cheongju Craft Biennale is having its 10th anniversary in 2019. Since its inception in 1999 under the theme of ‘Hands of Harmony’, the Cheongju Craft Biennale has grown to become the only craft biennale in the world that covers all the fields of craft arts. With annual participation of 3000 artists from 60 countries and 300,000 visitors, it has cemented its status as the world’s largest craft art event. 
 
Q: The exhibition A Scholar’s Feast: Old and New opens soon at the Korean Cultural Centre Gallery. What is the exhibition about? 
A: A Scholar’s Feast: Old and New reflects upon the spirit of the Scholars in Korea, illustrating traditional and contemporary Korean crafts related to the food and tableware. Spanning leather, glass, clay, fibre, wood, textile and brassware, it focuses to explore the value of Korean craft culture and the beauty of the handmade. As part of the 2018 Project for Global Connected by the Korean Foundation for International Cultural Exchange (KOFICE), this exhibition delves into food culture and craft, which are most intricately connected with our lives, as topics that show the heritage of excellent food culture and the artistic quality of craftwork in Cheongju, a city whose vision for the future is shared with the Cheongju Craft Biennale.
 
Q: We are delighted to be hosting the workshop series at ADC, including weaving, leather and Jogakbo (runner making). Why are these crafts important to Korean culture?
A: These crafts have played a significant role in many aspects of Korean culture among ordinary people including the noble family. In terms of affordable materials, not only used for a practical purpose but also used in arts and crafts that expressed the way Korean felt at that time. In Korea, like a meditation, a craft requires time, effort and enthusiasm in itself.
 
Q: Who Is teaching these workshops?
A: LEE Kanglok, KO Eunjin and JEONG Jeongsook are Cheongju based craft artists. LEE is a self-taught fibre artist and weaver. Using a range of straws from the natural environment, he focuses on not only traditional techniques but also sustainable materials, sourced from Korean farmers. As a leather artist, KO utilises Korean traditional patterns and motifs and shows how to create beautiful tableware applying them to leather crafts. JEONG works across a range of materials and styles, much of which represents traditional Jogakbo techniques hundreds of years ago. She utilises traditional skills to complete contemporary aesthetics.

Q: How can people book to attend these workshops and what will they learn?

Korean Weaving Workshop: Bokjori(lucky bag) making
Artist LEE Kanglok tells the history of weaving crafts in Korea and participants will make a handmade Bokjori (lucky bag) with greater pleasure. All materials provided.
Session 1: Sunday 10 February, 5 - 6pm (10 participants)
Session 2: Monday 11 February, 2 - 3pm (10 participants)
Session 3: Tuesday 12 February, 11am-12noon (10 participants)

Korean Jogakbo workshop: Runner making
In this fun hands-on workshop with Artist JEONG Jeongsook, participants will learn how to put plenty of patterns and colours together to make a piece of runner. All materials provided.
Session 1: Sunday 10 February, 2 - 5pm (12 participants)
Session 2: Monday 11 February, 11am - 2pm (12 participants)
Session 3: Tuesday 12 February, 3-6pm (12 participants)

Korean leather workshop: Tea coaster making
With Artist KO Eunjin, participants will create their own stamped leather tea coaster with Korean patterns. All materials provided.
Session 1: Sunday 10 February, 11am - 2pm (12 participants)
Session 2: Monday 11 February, 3-6pm (12 participants)
Session 3: Tuesday 12 February, 12 -3pm (12 participants)

Workshops will be held at Australian Design Centre, 113 - 115 William Street, Darlinghurst. Enter via Palmer Street.

For information how to get to ADC via public transport or parking click here

Please use the links above for bookings and more information. 


Image: Jaemin Song. Courtesy of Cheongju Craft Biennale Organization Committee